Visiting Artists

Fall,  
2016

One of the founding figures of the Chinese independent documentary film movement, Wu Wenguang has been working in recent years on the Memory Project, a wide-ranging documentary history of China’s Great Famine (1958-1961), featuring interviews with thousands of famine survivors.

Fall,  
2016

A photographer and self-proclaimed visual activist, Zanele Muholi explores black lesbian and gay identities and politics in contemporary South Africa. For her series “Faces and Phases” (2006-11), Muholi photographed more than 200 portraits of South Africa’s lesbian community. “The portraits are at once a visual statement and an archive,” she has said, “marking, mapping, and preserving an often invisible community for posterity.” 

Spring,  
2016

Photographer and professor of photography at Tufts University and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Jim Dow's work can be found in many prestigious public collections including the Museum of Modern Art New York, Museum of Modern Art, and the Library of Congress Washington DC. Dow is also the recipient of the 2014 Focus Lifetime Achievement Award.

Spring,  
2016

Nancy Cohen’s works are comprised of many mediums: handmade paper, found objects, resin and, for the past 10 years, glass. She chooses a basic form and, using it repetitively, transforms the object into rays of morphed forms that crawl across the surface of a wall. Cohen’s themes are based in particle physics, mathematics, and chemistry.

Spring,  
2016

Natasha Trethewey was born in Mississippi to professor Eric Trethewey and social worker Gwendolyn Ann Turnbough. The daughter of a mixed-race marriage, she spent time in Atlanta with her mother and in New Orleans with her father. Trethewey earned an MA in English from Hollins University, and received an MFA in poetry from the University of Massachusetts. In 2012 she was named Poet Laureate of the state of Mississippi and the 19th Poet Laureate of the United States. 

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